Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park

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Address:
33104 NW 192nd Ave
Basinger, FL 34972

Website:
https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/kissimmee-prairie-preserve-state-park

Phone:
(863) 462-5360

About Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park

The reserve protects one of the last remaining parts of Florida's endangered plants and animals. Driving the five-mile road through the park, you can enjoy scenic views of Lake Okeechobee, the Great Smoky Mountains and the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The park is home to the endangered Florida locust sparrow and offers excellent seasonal bird watching opportunities. It is the only national park in the state with a large population of this species and one of only a handful of other places in Florida.

For overnight stays, the park has a complete infrastructure with primitive horseback tents and 100 miles of dirt roads that allow hikers, cyclists and riders to explore the prairie landscape and shady hammocks. The remote location of Kissimmee Prairie makes it one of the best places to see the stars in Florida. Ranger - guided "prairie buggy tours" take visitors to remote areas within the parks.

It is difficult to find a place in Florida as beautiful as Kissimmee Prairie State Park in the heart of the Florida Panhandle. Located on the west side of Lake Okeechobee, the hotel is just a few miles from the park entrance.

Campers on the prairie have the opportunity to see stars, planets and other celestial bodies in incredible numbers and unforgettable splendor. The International Space Station and the Space Shuttle are visible from Kissimmee Prairie as they orbit Earth.

For nature tourists, Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park offers excellent bird watching opportunities. With spectacular views of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Florida Keys, it offers the best night sky views in the region.

The park also offers a wide variety of habitats, including wetlands, dry prairies, deciduous forests and hammocks, to provide a full day of rest for birdwatchers and nature tourists. The park provides refuge to a number of endangered species, including the Great Blue Heron, a bird species with a unique habitat. Highlights of birding in Kissimmee Prairie include the Red-crested Falcon and the recently established White-tailed Kites, as well as many other species.

The arrival of the white man was actually the beginning of cattle farming in Florida. When Juan Ponce de Leon arrived in 1512, he brought horses and seven Andalusian cows.

These early cattle were described by their horns, which were often three-foot wide from tip to tip and up to six feet long.

Franciscan monks who lived with the Indians taught them many things, including the establishment of cattle herds. The Seminole Indians clearly demonstrated the economic potential of livestock farming in Florida, and groups like the Oconee established a very profitable livestock business. Early Spaniards tried to breed cattle and eventually what we know today as Texas Longhorn developed.

The early settlers who moved to Florida found abundant wildlife inland, and the monks were replaced by the Indians in the early 19th century with the arrival of the Seminole Indians and their cattle.

After the brief British occupation of Florida, many of the British plantation owners began to raise cattle, and it was necessary to hunt cattle in the wild. These men soon became known as "cow hunters," and after the end of the American Revolution, Spain regrouped control of Florida and liberalized its immigration policy.

At the beginning of the 19th century, cattle were constantly stolen by roving Indian gangs, and the noise from cattle was believed to have been the cause of Seminole and Indian wars. A new breed of cowman arrived, each bringing his own herd of cows, but they were soon challenged by the Indians, who managed to farm the prairie.

When Andrew Jackson led several battles against the Seminoles in 1817, he netted more than 1,600 cattle heads. After the war, the settlers moved further inland, many of them began to raise their own cattle. It was the territorial cowmen of the 19th century who made cattle an important part of Florida's economy.

The first rounds of beef lasted eight to ten days, and the cowboys ate food consisting of biscuits, meat, fat and sweet potatoes, which turned sour after three days in the heat. The biscuits were good on the first day, but they hardened afterwards and had to be removed by the mould makers and eaten as biscuits.

At other times, women traveled with the crew, and a fly-over tent was erected and large plates of meat hung over the campfire. Cabbage and hearts would have been put on the menu and cows slaughtered, but no cabbage or heart in the meat.

In the early 1940s, Latt-Maxcy Corporation began buying land in what is now Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. The prairie cattle breeding was considerably improved and for the first time in the history of the park herds of 1000 to 1200 cattle were herded. The Avon Park Bombing Range was leased to large parts of the country to train B-17 aircraft crews for air and ground attacks.

Between 1946 and 1963, the lease was terminated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

After the termination of the lease, Latt-Maxcy Corporation improved its pasture land by digging drainage ditches in the wetland slums. Cattle ponds were built to protect cattle from ticks and screw worms, and cattle still graze on the park, which has been converted into an improved pasture. Proceeds from the leases and the park will be used for resource management and restoration projects.

Water and electricity are only available at the family campsite, but spacious bathhouses and laundry facilities are available at all family campsites and are available to all campers throughout the park. Campers can experience the wilderness, as they are surrounded by 54,000 hectares of unspoilt land.

Pets are allowed on all family campsites, but ask Reserve America if the length of your pitch is limited. RV parks are available in the parking lot of the central landfill, which is located at the entrance to the family mobile home parking lot.

Pets are welcome, but must be kept on a lead and not left unattended and behave well at all times. Pets are allowed on all family campsites and are not allowed in the central landfill or family mobile home parking.

From insects to stars, the library is a fun way to experience the real Florida for your child. Give your children a quiet afternoon before bed by explaining the sights and sounds of Kissimmee Prairie. KissIMMEE Prairie also offers a variety of activities for campers aged four to nine years and for children aged 5 to 9 years.

The park offers three primitive campsites in the wild, and each has a picnic table and a campfire.

This location is about 3.5 km from the park office and can only be reached on foot or by bike.

Pack your own water, pack your garbage and pack a picnic table, a fireplace, picnic chairs, food, water and other essentials.

All three places are available to individuals and groups, maximum four people per place. If your group is larger, call the park manager at 863 - 462 - 5360 for more information. Call the Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park Public Information Office at (862) 463-462-5360 or the Park Manager's Office at 1-866-567-3200 for a full list of available seats.

Pets are not allowed on primitive campgrounds or in the wild, but access to the stables of the park is guaranteed. All toilets are barrier-free and barrier-free, as are toilets, showers and shower rooms.

A fully equipped, barrier-free bathhouse is located near the family campsite, and additional toilets are located in the office.

Find a unique place in the world where you can see the same combination of plants and animals, and find yourself in one of the most unique places in the world where you can see all these animals. Wildflowers adorn the landscape, including burning stars, red and white pines, black and white pineapples, blue - instant sparrows, white - tail-shaped deer feeding on tender grasses, yellow - hairy squirrels, and wild boars. If you listen carefully, you will hear the endangered Florida Sparrow singing their song. Scan the sky and see a bald eagle hovering above you as you walk along the coast, just a few hundred yards from the park entrance. You can scare off a white tail that feeds on the tender grass, or let an indigo snake slip through the wire grass hidden under the wires and grass.

Enjoy the prairie as you explore, with its unique combination of plants, animals and wildflowers, as well as the natural beauty of the landscape.

Please note that the path is shared with cyclists, cyclists and parked vehicles. Therefore, please note the roadside sign that you share with your driver, cyclist or parking.

Pets are allowed on access roads, but must be kept on a leash and always well behaved. Pets are not allowed in the parking lot or the parking lot of the hiking trail or on the street, and pets are not allowed near the entrance to Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park. Please note the traffic signs that you share with hikers, cyclists and parked vehicles.

Pets are allowed on access roads, but must be kept on a leash and always well behaved. Pets must not be left unattended at any time. Pets are not allowed in the parking lot or parking lot of Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park or in any of the parking lots on the reserve.

Pets are allowed on multi-purpose trails that consist of park service roads, but are not allowed on primitive campgrounds in the wild. Pets are allowed on some of the campgrounds in Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park and on the park's main hiking network. Pets are not allowed on any campsite and pets are not allowed near primitive camper pitches or in wilderness areas.

Pets must be kept on a leash, be well behaved at all times and not left unattended or alone. Pets are allowed on some of the park's main trails, but not near primitive campgrounds or in wilderness areas.

Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is one of the most popular hiking and camping destinations in the state of Florida, according to the Florida Department of Natural Resources.

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What is the phone number for Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park?

The phone number for Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is (863) 462-5360.


Where is Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park located?

Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is located at 33104 NW 192nd Ave , Basinger, FL 34972


What is the internet address for Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park?

The website (URL) for Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/kissimmee-prairie-preserve-state-park


What is the latitude and longitude of Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park?

You can use Latitude: 27.57457230 Longitude: -81.02279460 coordinates in your GPS.


Is there a key contact at Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park?

You can contact Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park at (863) 462-5360.

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Hours of Operation

Monday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Tuesday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Wednesday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Thursday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Friday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM
Sunday
8:00 AM 6:00 PM

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